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Industry-School Partnership Policy and Funding Mechanism

Question

Task:You could focus on education partnerships in general or be more specific like industry and school partnerships.

Describe the issues of setting up partnerships in education settings.

For example, if you examined industry (for profit) and school partnerships, you would find a HUGE amount of literature about the reasons for and against this which would very nicely fit into an in depth SWOT analysis... much like the group analysis.

So, remembering that 3,000 words is acceptable, you could break that down into a few hundred words on what we know currently about industry and school partnerships (via literature) and then you could paragraph by paragraph talk about all the smaller issues that have to happen to make partnerships work and all of the hurdles they may face.

Developing strategic partnerships are currently at the forefront of place-based education efforts. Review the literature on forming partnerships in education. Provide a synthesis and critique of the theory. In doing so, consider some recommendations for successful partnership building and sustainability Please take note of the hurdle requirements.

Answer

Abstract: The success of industry-school partnership (ISP) depends upon policy and its funding mechanisms. The bridging of a knowledge gap in the post-industrial age, various organizations across diversified industries have entered into an industry-school partnership. The various strategic partnering in the education sector with that of the industry faced with tremendous challenges, hence strategies need to be devised to overcome them. The focus on strengthening strategic partnership has to be the core of a sustainable relationship. It will help to overcome the weaknesses and taking advantage of the several opportunities offered in such partnering. ISPs share resources and build trust, they also offer innovative educational ideas that directly affect employees. Therefore, cogeneration programs create real and direct value for both schools (students and students) and industry. In particular, the ISP may use funds that exceed the school's financial capacity. Structural issues are a major deterrent for the formation of industry-school partnerships. This document describes the most important institutional tensions in the internships of governments, universities, universities, and employers. The relationship between industry and the school, as well as the relationship between the company and the various members of the organization, was also crucial for the effective coordination of individual ISPs. Watters, Hay, Dempster and Pillay, (2013) states that most has been in contact with community members who can support schools in achieving their business goals. The ISPs are also coordinated through contracts or agreements or contracts that reinforce mutually beneficial objectives. When partners do not think and do not make their own efforts, the ISF reaches an unsustainable threshold and exceeds the threshold.

Introduction : Across international boundaries, industries, and government stakeholders, collaborative arrangements with schools have emerged tremendously in the recent time period (Flynn, Pillay, and Watters, 2016). The success of industry-school partnership (ISP) depends upon policy and its funding mechanisms. The bridging of a knowledge gap in the post-industrial age, various organizations across diversified industries have entered into an industry-school partnership. An industry-school partnership can be of various forms and regarded as joint ventures, school-enterprise cooperation, public-private partnership, networks, collaborations, coalitions, social partnership, business-school relationship, community-school partnership, industry-school engagement and so on. The broadest level in partnership is defined within cooperative institutional arrangements amongst the private and public sector (Pillay, Watters & Hoff, 2013). There are present various arrangements initiating from formal contractual agreements to informal cooperation as well as support activities for the purpose of attaining mutual goals. In Australia, there is a prevalent industry and school level partnership at a systematic level. Various literature is available that reflects the presence of industry such as energy, mineral, construction, and building with that of school-level partnership. A strategic partnership has gained tremendous prominence and has currently been placed forefront of place-based education. The current discussion includes some literature analysis of forming such a partnership in education with certain recommendations for forming successful partnership building and sustainability.

Concept overview: Industry-school partnering offers several benefits in the education sector, as per Pillay, Watters, and Hoff (2013). The partnering of the education sector with the industry will allow a strategic form of partnering that will yield benefits to both parties. However, there are various issues that face setting up a partnership of industry with schools. Initially, ISP was viewed as a method for the public (education) sector with the private sector towards the reduction of costs. In close institutional relations between employers, whether they are in primary school, the partnership between education and industry is becoming increasingly interested in shared responsibility for the transition of young people. These partnerships are very important and perhaps more essential in communities that do not have strong forms of cooperation between government, employers, trade unions and civil society organizations. Elementary school curricula require special skills for learners. Many of them can only be taught and implemented in a real working environment. As a result, it is new structured internships are created when students become job leaders and create a list of rights. On the other hand, these types of programs can bring great benefits to companies.

This belief is based upon the fact that the private sector operates with an efficient forefront and activity system that are not bounded by a rigid type of public sector bureaucratic institutionalism. Flynn, Pillay, and Watters (2015) analyses the ISP is generally formed with the core aim of providing increased access of educational services into geographically dispersed locations, that allows overcoming coordination and barrier difficulties related to remote and rural students. As it has been rightly been identified that in several places such as Queensland, there is a vast distance between rural communities and cities. A most important and critical aspect for the education sector is to keep pace with industry knowledge related innovativeness so as to keep up with new work based practices and products that are connected with innovative educational solutions. The various strategic partnering in the education sector with that of the industry faced with tremendous challenges, hence strategies need to be devised to overcome them. The focus on strengthening strategic partnership has to be the core of a sustainable relationship. It will help to overcome the weaknesses and taking advantage of the several opportunities offered in such partnering.

Literature Review: The scope of current literature framework evaluates the several benefits of industry-school partnership along with analyzing recommendations that can lead to developing sustainable strategic partnership amongst them.

Benefits offered by industry-school partnering: ISPs share resources and build trust, they also offer innovative educational ideas that directly affect employees. Therefore, cogeneration programs create real and direct value for both schools (students and students) and industry. In particular, the ISP may use funds that exceed the school's financial capacity. Hay and Kapitzke (2009) states these resources include industry standards that are compatible with laboratory and school workshops and with the ease of qualified personnel. An innovative contextual curriculum in the industry can result in a service provider providing an opportunity to transfer employee knowledge and on-site training. In many European countries, Canada has a market-oriented model rather than a tradition of vocational training. In such deregulation of voluntary education, it is more difficult to develop and support learning through work. Pillay, Watters, Hoff, and Flynn (2014) already mentioned, partnership with countries like Canada is increasingly seen as a political solution to the problems of young people entering the labor market. These reflect the new approaches of public administration focusing on alliances, shared responsibility and accountability. It also reflects an interest in local decision-making, while governments are often the most important initiatives in new partnerships.

Various groups may also have different opinions on internships. For example. Is the integration of social integration into the disproportionate view of the learner as a quality educational path. Similarly, focusing on partnership is different and capacity building to support economic goals is different from a socio-democratic capacity-based vision. Changes in working life can also cause tensions in the partnership. For example, British handicrafts are more industrialized, integrated, mechanized and more skilled.

Current literature does not clearly reflect the interests of the ISP providers offered by industry. This is probably due to the fact that the interests of the industry are clear, such that the Forum for the Recruitment of Future Employees. The secondary benefit for industry is the ability to influence school plans so that future employees can be better tailored to the needs of the industry. There are less clear benefits such as good citizenship through sponsorship and local schools. Good citizenship is particularly important for industries that are usually confronted with social uprisings such as aerospace, construction, and mining.

The creation of efficient ISP service providers is characterized by differences between stakeholders and related practical standards. Despite the divergent views of the parties, we have set a goal of mutual benefits. Roberts (2009) states crossing is a tool that effectively overcomes a clear obstacle between two different organizations, such as school and private company. In the ISP, the process runs on two levels. First, waypoints are a way to identify and negotiate barriers to the development of an ISP provider and to improve compatibility in a new environment. identifying barriers to cross-border borders, such as a consensus within subgroups, which may hinder objectivity in determining the purpose of Internet providers. These barriers can be addressed by creating partnerships and solving common problems.

Secondly, since the main goal of ISPs is to facilitate the transition from school work to continuing education, school-age children become students, who allow entry points with student compatibility and work orientation. As a result, students should be able to participate in legitimate border crossings and credible training experiences, thereby increasing their personal employability. This can happen if two practical communities (school and industry) are connected. This means that relevant professionals (teachers and individuals) intend to set boundaries for hybrid school spaces for students with formal and school education and practice. To do this, the industry partner often offers resources such as access to modern tools and information products.

Cross-sector partnerships create common interests through cross-border cooperation is a useful tool for removing the cross-border concept of ISPs. It describes important stakeholder organizations as a structured catalyst that enables partnership and partnership building. These organizations can accelerate change by enabling connections between potential partners. They allow different views to converge to existing scales at different scales. In this document, the Queensland Mineral and Energy Academy (QMEA) is a structural catalyst for ISP service providers for schools, minerals, and energy. QMEA uses a direct relationship with leading organizations and companies that deliver results to schools and industry. ISP Service Providers Schools should make it easier for the industry to cross borders with industry.

In short, school work is carried out in an environment that is naturally competitive and places institutional actors among the various interests and goals in the field of work and learning. This is probably a problem and requires a lot of development work and organizational work. The relationship between partners, sponsors, and communities, and collaboration with the industry is likely to have a significant impact on learning and is therefore important for analysis.

Issues facing industry-school partnership: Structural issues are a major deterrent for the formation of industry-school partnerships. This document describes the most important institutional tensions in the internships of governments, universities, universities, and employers. Ehlen, van der Klink and Boshuizen (2016) evaluates many of these tensions are common to others and some of them are easier to solve than others. For example, the government may take measures to improve education. Vocational training on the demand side may be a greater problem. Training programs can be a tool to promote learning outcomes.

These systems are not just a school system that can be used. Secondly, the low level of participation in vocational training has weakened as carpentry products are a small number of women. This is the main theme of the state administration (including teachers and trainers). The policy focuses on high-level education in the workplace. Even for interviews paid out of training, lack of formal feedback and mentoring although it is clear, it cannot be accepted.

Theoretical construct: The concept of industry-education partnership is a two-step theory. Such a relationship can be explained on the basis of stakeholder theory and relationship management. Stakeholder theory can be traced during the depression era; though it started with Freeman's work in 1984. They are all based on the principle of interest in an organization or company. Although most literature reflects they are interested in ethics and business strategy. Discussion and application of stakeholder theory in education can reveal in-depth and detailed understanding regarding strategic partnering.

Training could be improved if it could play a key role in the economy. Hence, students deserve better representation in the most sector. Educational experience in the industry should create impressions and relationships. Seth, Carr Jr, Wenger, McNair, and Tangorra (2014) states, the relationship between industry and students must be focused on quality and initial training. Students from working life and start-up obtain certification and obtain a clear link between service providers. This means that the relationship management model can be used in strengthening these relationships. The government occupies a symbiotic relationship that can serve all those interested indefinitely. This has two important effects, the relationship between education and industry must be managed, developed and maintained. Part of the training industry takes develops a strategic decision to make it more effective. The first part of the shared plan was the development of an industrial association group.

In the early stages of the process, it was noted that the industry should participate at a higher level than the traditional processes. The school needs to experience after contact. The relationship needs to begin at the lower levels of the organization (Leonard, 2011). As the program develops, there are other members of the organization that gets involved. The second part of the initiative is to design the professional training of the students. The last year of university studies. The purpose of the course was to protect the interests of the EU. It must be negotiated and professional development in universities. Discover the different areas of the industry and career opportunities. It was, of course, a bridge between the separation of theory and practice. After all, professional training is an innovative practice for students.

Key Areas of ISP: There was no pertinent result areas in the domain of leadership found in ISP. The ISP in the aviation industry were similar because only project coordinators or managers were coordinating projects. The weakness of this approach is that the focus of the ISP is too sensitive to the individual. The mineral and energy service provider are coordinated with a more typical organizational structure. QMEA, the Government and the Queensland Resources Council have set up a Steering Committee composed of an Executive Director, Sales Director and Project Manager. This brokerage type model has been identified as a strategic catalyst for the entire ISP.

However, this approach is also a challenge because a geographically dispersed state like Queensland is expensive and demanding.

The proximity of schools to industrial projects was key to coordinating individual ISPs. However, building and building ISPs with schools were limited when the work was coordinated because they were entrusted to major state infrastructure projects (XIE & HU, 2011). Placing students on new projects outside the school was a challenge, and even if it was economically feasible, the model left schools that had not previously had a sustainable project. When the government began to coordinate the construction and construction of the ISP, it was based on individual relationships in practice rather than institutional arrangements. This may interfere with the QMEA model, where an individual initially coordinates but the demand has increased, QMEA is ready to manage an ISP.

Recommendations for Sustainability: The relationship between industry and the school, as well as the relationship between the company and the various members of the organization, was also crucial for the effective coordination of individual ISPs. Watters, Hay, Dempster and Pillay, (2013) states that most has been in contact with community members who can support schools in achieving their business goals. The ISPs are also coordinated through contracts or agreements or contracts that reinforce mutually beneficial objectives. The Memorandum of Understanding may include clearly documented roles and responsibilities, as well as the roles and plans of each partner as a basis for effective ISP coordination and operation.

Minerals and energy suppliers have implemented a number of MOUs between schools and companies across Australia. While some industrial partners, other than colleagues (CEOs), have not seen a crucial memorandum of understanding, they have considered and assessed the MoU as a means of ensuring the commitment and sustainability of ISPs. This was particularly important for the effective coordination of initiatives by different ISPs and sharing of human and financial resources. For example, changes in industry priorities have changed in the focus of ISPs in the space sector.

Initially ISP, focused on training and maintenance engineers for pilots and cabin crew who were specifically involved in maintenance contracts for Boeing F111 military aircraft. The use of F111 has been stopped and the global financial crisis has affected aviation partnerships. The new sector has filled this gap, especially in the minerals and energy sectors, where the demand for aircraft has increased significantly. An Internet service provider for raw materials and energy has shown a similar picture in which economic fluctuations in the mining sector have affected ISP targets. In some cases, this has led to the exclusion of direct financing by company sponsorship in order to increase in-kind contributions.

An overestimation of the qualifications of the candidates was an interesting reflection on the building and the ISP. This vision was also an important factor for energy and mineral suppliers, where students had similar or better qualifications than those of industry employees. To make the payroll problem even more difficult for employees, full-time research, programming was included. In addition, the lack of knowledge of teachers in the industry was problematic. It was a problem when teachers had to develop the program with industry examples. The problem has been partially solved by professional development and various sources of teachers.

ISP partners must identify and understand the types of boundaries and common interfaces between schools and different sectors. This also includes obvious general differences between industrial or individual companies. This knowledge helps to clarify and manage expectations and identify the real interfaces in which associations can be developed. The most important thing is to identify partners and factors that can radically change or stop cooperation. For example, economic fluctuations or policies change.

Effective models for coordinating ISPs between partners depend on the geographic scope of the activity. For ISPs operating in geographically dispersed locations, they can serve as small brokerage organizations that can serve as cross-border structural catalysts. This model converts the perspectives of the partners and can use academic and industry channels through the ISP. Employees and travel of this model are not available to ISPs with limited budgets. ISPs working in a more localized environment prefer a single coordinator or project manager who can work directly and effectively with stakeholders. It should be noted that this model is a personal distribution of a single coordinator. It is necessary to focus on both models of succession planning to ensure the sustainability of ISPs.

It is expected that Internet service providers, who accept considerations and solve problems in a transparent manner, create innovative and sustainable programs.

Conclusion
Thus it can be concluded that the ISP has a series of tasks to fulfill. But when problems are communicated openly with partners, it is typical of all partners and eager to find new solutions acceptable to all. Likewise, when partners do not think and do not make their own efforts, the ISF reaches an unsustainable threshold and exceeds the threshold. ISP providers that want to integrate applications into existing external systems are transforming and implementing a school transition that meets the needs of all partners and, ultimately, the final beneficiary, the student.

Cross-border borders require a common organization to identify, coordinate and activate common areas. This did not happen spontaneously but requires clear principles designed for ISPs. A better understanding of the dynamics of the ISF was a useful objective. The concrete boundaries of the schools could be explored in more detail as part of a practical and forward-looking investigation. Industry-school partnership assignments are being prepared by our management assignment help experts from top universities which let us to provide you a reliable online assignment help service.

References
Ehlen, C. G., van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. (2016). Unravelling the social dynamics of an industry–school partnership: social capital as perspective for co-creation. Studies in Continuing Education, 38(1), 61-85. doi: 10.1080/0158037X.2015.1030610. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0158037X.2015.1030610

Ehlen, C. G., van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. (2016). Unravelling the social dynamics of an industry–school partnership: social capital as perspective for co-creation. Studies in Continuing Education, 38(1), 61-85. doi: 10.1080/0158037X.2015.1030610. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0158037X.2015.1030610

Flynn, M. C., Pillay, H., & Watters, J. (2016). Industry–school partnerships: Boundary crossing to enable school to work transitions. Journal of Education and Work, 29(3), 309-331. doi: 10.1080/13639080.2014.934789. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13639080.2014.934789

Hay, S., & Kapitzke, C. (2009). Industry school partnerships: reconstituting spaces of educational governance. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 7(2), 203-216. doi: 10.1080/14767720902908109. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14767720902908109

Leonard, J. (2011). Using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory to understand community partnerships: A historical case study of one urban high school. Urban Education, 46(5), 987-1010. doi: 10.1177/0042085911400337. Retrieved from https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0042085911400337

Pillay, H., Watters, J. J., & Hoff, L. (2013). Critical attributes of public-private partnerships: A case study in vocational education. International Journal of Adult Vocational Education and Technology (IJAVET), 4(1), 31-45. Retrieved from https://www.igi-global.com/article/content/76914

Seth, D., Carr Jr, J. J., Wenger, A. D., McNair, L. D., & Tangorra, J. L. (2014, June). College and nonprofit industry partnership: coupling undergraduate projects with K-12 outreach program to enhance engineering education. In 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition (pp. 24-286). Retrieved from https://peer.asee.org/college-and-nonprofit-industry-partnership-coupling-undergraduate-projects-with-k-12-outreach-program-to-enhance-engineering-education

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